The ISU program aims to make financial literacy easy to understand

Iowa is one of many states that require high school students to take some form of personal finance literacy course before graduation. A program at Iowa State University hopes to make it easier for teachers to teach the value of a dollar. It’s called Small Change: Building Financial Security. The program is for K-12 teachers, who are learning financial literacy concepts online and in person so they can teach their children. Teachers follow a four-week online program, with modules on topics such as investing, retirement planning, insurance and basic financial concepts. More than 400 educators have already completed the program. “Being a good consumer is so important because it’s a complicated market in terms of financial services and products. If you don’t start young and make a few mistakes, it will stay with you for a very long time,” Suzanne Bartholomae, Iowa State University professor said. The UIS sends follow-up surveys to teachers three months after they finish to see what they have done with the knowledge. Many participants reported bringing their new knowledge back into the classroom for their students. They learn lessons like how to write a check, the importance of saving money on paychecks, and the cost of college. Money can be daunting, so program organizers hope they can make a small change in people’s lives. “There’s research that shows that when people have to teach about a topic they’re not comfortable with and financial literacy is definitely one of those topics, they’re less likely to implement it. in their class,” Bartholomae said. The next cohort starts in July. Not only are the educators better teachers after the program, but about 76% of participants feel they are personally more comfortable with money.

Iowa is one of many states that require high school students to take some form of personal finance literacy course before graduation. A program at Iowa State University hopes to make it easier for teachers to teach the value of a dollar.

It’s called Small Change: Building Financial Security. The program is for K-12 teachers, who are learning financial literacy concepts online and in person so they can teach their children.

Teachers follow a four-week online program, with modules on topics such as investing, retirement planning, insurance and basic financial concepts. More than 400 educators have already completed the program.

“Being a good consumer is so important because it’s a complicated market in terms of financial services and products. If you don’t start young and make a few mistakes, it will stay with you for a very long time,” Suzanne Bartholomae, Iowa State University professor said.

The UIS sends follow-up surveys to teachers three months after they finish to see what they have done with the knowledge. Many participants reported bringing their new knowledge back into the classroom for their students.

They learn lessons like how to write a check, the importance of saving money on paychecks, and the cost of college. Money can be daunting, so program organizers hope they can make a small change in people’s lives.

“There’s research that shows that when people have to teach about a topic they’re not comfortable with and financial literacy is definitely one of those topics, they’re less likely to implement it. in their class,” Bartholomae said.

The next cohort starts in July.

Not only are the educators better teachers after the program, but about 76% of participants feel they are personally more comfortable with money.

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